Flower season

If you don’t like wildflowers, keep scrolling! It’s wildflower Wednesday and the alpine flowers are beginning to bloom. Glacier lilies, spring beauty, western anemone, paintbrush, sulphur buckwheat, Sitka valerian, Columbia lilies, and white bog orchids can all be found in Manning Park right now along with many others I neglected to photograph!

I maxed out my allocation for this multi-photo post – I would have included more if Instagram allowed….

  1. A glacier lily backlit by afternoon sunshine – the perfect glacier lily photo! This photo was taken on our descent from Frosty Mountain and we arrived at this pocket meadow in the forest at just the right time for the sun to find a gap in the trees and light up the flowers. Beautiful!
  2. Of course, one is never enough but I like this one because it shows the under-appreciated (and hard to photograph) spring beauty, a gorgeous diminutive little flower that blooms alongside the glacier lily and anemone.
  3. Spring beauty in full bloom – see how pretty it is? It’s well named! We first encountered spring beauty when we lived in Maryland, though it was common in low-lying woodland rather than in the alpine (of which there wasn’t any really!).
  4. The glacier lilies may be my favourite, but the stars of the show up at Blackwall Peak were the western anemones which were blooming everywhere, and often right along the edge of the trail. That made getting photos very convenient!
  5. I couldn’t decide whether I liked the shot from the side or from above, so I posted both.
  6. I can never resist a photo of paintbrush either, especially when it’s still in bud like this. I’m pleasantly surprised by how much detail my phone camera captured, down to all the fine hairs on the reddening bracts.
  7. This was a nice surprise: sulphur buckwheat in bud. I like how the flower head is divided up into sub-flowers, each with their own collection of florets.
  8. Sitka valerian – the name conjures up the smell of autumn in the mountains as they have quite a pungent scent when they begin to fade. It was the shape of this one that caught my eye, and it was only later I realized I’d caught just a single flower blooming.
  9. This Columbia lily was blooming right next to our camp site, and taking its picture was the first thing I did when I got out of the car πŸ™‚ We saw many at the roadside as we drove into and through Manning Park; I’d love to have stopped and taken a few photos but that’s just not a particularly safe thing to do on such a busy highway.
  10. Lastly, a tall white bog orchid. As with the Columbia lilies, we saw some really good displays of these by the side of Highway 3. But I was happy with this one at the edge of the marsh by the beaver pond. I love the contrast of the green and white on these flowers.

As I alluded to in the caption above, there were many flowers that I either didn’t photograph or couldn’t feature in this little collection, although a good many of those were taken with our “real” cameras which aren’t as easy to post to Instagram. This is definitely my favourite time of the year now, where I’m torn between seeking mountain summits and spending hours photographing flower meadows…

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An ice waterfall

This was going to be a waterfall-Wednesday post but I didn’t get round to it so it’s a frozen-Friday photo instead πŸ™‚ This is the uppermost part of the falls on Joffre Creek between the middle and upper lakes, where not much water is flowing but some lovely ice formations have been created. Earlier in the day I watched a dipper hop its way up the terraces of waterfall, eventually disappearing over the top to the creek above.

On my way up to the top lake, I paused to admire the waterfall although it was lit too strongly by the sun to make an interesting photograph. A blur of movement caught my eye and I spotted a dipper as it landed on one of the lower terraces of the waterfall. I watched it for minute or two as it hopped from terrace to terrace before disappearing out of sight at the top of the falls.

As I neared the waterfall on my return, I looked upstream as the trail switched back down the slope and noticed some striking blue ice formations that I hadn’t noticed earlier. I picked my way through the snow (I had to be careful as I was on a steep slope) to get this angle on the falls and framed up my photo. While I composed with the native 3:2 aspect ratio of the camera, I could see that the majority of the scene was contained within a region that would probably work for a square crop on Instagram. Thankfully I was right.

I just love the colour and shape of the ice and I’m very happy that I was able to capture and reproduce that colour and texture. Definitely another of my favourite photos from the day.

Still winter

The view up to Mount Matier and its namesake glacier from lower Joffre Lake – still very much frozen, very much snowy. It’s late in the day for Trip-Plan Tuesday but after reading a few posts and seeing the number of unprepared hikers at Joffre Lakes I feel compelled to add my two cents.

The view up to Mount Matier and its namesake glacier from lower Joffre Lake – still very much frozen, very much snowy. It's late in the day for #TripPlanTuesday but after reading a few posts and seeing the number of unprepared hikers at Joffre Lakes I feel compelled to add my two cents. With a warm weekend in the city it's perhaps not surprising that people want to get out and enjoy the outdoors. But don't you think that driving past 5-foot snowbanks at the side of the road would be a bit of a clue as to how snowy the hiking trails might be? Don't you think that heading into the mountains wearing your casual street clothes might not be the best idea? Did you bring a hat? Gloves? Has your phone battery just died due to the cold? My concern is that those who made it up to upper Joffre Lake and back without incident will have learned nothing from their trip. They slipped and slid their way up, and avoided sliding off the trail into the trees or creek below on the way down. They made it back to the car with freezing cold hands, a little hungry and thirsty. It was all good fun (as it should be!) and maybe they managed to squeeze a photo or two out of their phone before the battery gave up. Maybe that photo made it onto Instagram and shows what a great time they had. But I would like to think that something registered in their mind that maybe next time they should wear more suitable footwear, maybe buy some microspikes, and make sure their phone is fully charged when they leave the car. Maybe find out more about the trail conditions beforehand, and bring some warmer clothes. So as a relatively experienced hiker I feel I have to spread the word and encourage anyone and everyone heading out into the backcountry to do some trip research and planning before you go, especially now as we head into shoulder season. Check the AdventureSmart website, and check local hiking websites, forums, and Facebook groups. We hikers are an amiable bunch and we love telling others about our hikes! #joffrelakes #joffrelakesprovincialpark #hiking #snowshoeing #bcparks #mybcparks #standupforparks #explorebc #beautifulbc #tenessentials #beautifulbritishcolumbia #adventuresmart #ifttt

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With a warm weekend in the city it’s perhaps not surprising that people want to get out and enjoy the outdoors. But don’t you think that driving past 5-foot snowbanks at the side of the road would be a bit of a clue as to how snowy the hiking trails might be? Don’t you think that heading into the mountains wearing your casual street clothes might not be the best idea? Did you bring a hat? Gloves? Has your phone battery just died due to the cold?

My concern is that those who made it up to upper Joffre Lake and back without incident will have learned nothing from their trip. They slipped and slid their way up, and avoided sliding off the trail into the trees or creek below on the way down. They made it back to the car with freezing cold hands, a little hungry and thirsty. It was all good fun (as it should be!) and maybe they managed to squeeze a photo or two out of their phone before the battery gave up. Maybe that photo made it onto Instagram and shows what a great time they had.

But I would like to think that something registered in their mind that maybe next time they should wear more suitable footwear, maybe buy some microspikes, and make sure their phone is fully charged when they leave the car. Maybe find out more about the trail conditions beforehand, and bring some warmer clothes.

So as a relatively experienced hiker I feel I should spread the word and encourage anyone and everyone heading out into the backcountry to do some trip research and planning before you go, especially now as we head into shoulder season. Check the AdventureSmart website, and check local hiking websites, forums, and Facebook groups. We hikers are an amiable bunch and we love telling others about our hikes!

Postscript: I’ve been wanting to make some of these points for a while now but had not taken the time to write them out in a coherent manner. I still need to let my ideas gel a bit more before writing a more thoughtful and better-reasoned article, but the essence of what I want to get across is the fact that getting away with being unprepared likely means that nothing is learned from the situation. As a result, the same mistakes are repeated until something goes wrong.

And I believe that’s my first Instagram “blog” post πŸ™‚

Near and far

Near and far – Mt Baker peeks over the ridge of De Pencier bluffs.

While the weather this weekend was good enough to take this photo, this was actually taken a week ago. Yesterday’s good weather caught us off-guard and we had made other plans for the middle of the day…

I noticed this alignment of the bluffs and Mt Baker on our way up to the First Peak of Mt Seymour and thought I’d leave it until the descent when the light on Mt Baker would be a little warmer in order to emphasize the distance between the subjects. I was quite pleased to see that I was right and, with a little help from the polarizer to deepen the blue sky, I got pretty exactly the shot I was after. Ideally I would have preferred to have the longer lens to really compress the scene and isolate the two but I’m stuck with the reach of the 18-55 mm for now until I upgrade.

I really like how the nearby bluffs are crystal clear with the snow retaining a slight blue cast while Mt Baker is distinctly yellower and softer. I did adjust the colour of the deep shadow of the bluffs, warming it up slightly to render it more neutral and make it less distracting; winter shadows in the snow tend to be very blue and I didn’t want that to compete with the rest of the photo.

What surprised me most of all is that I have walked this route a couple of dozen times and don’t remember ever seeing that particular view before. Now I have to go back and look through all my Mt Seymour photos to check!

The king of views

Can’t believe it was 10 years ago that we were admiring this view. Still one of my favourite backpacking trips and I think about returning every time I see yet another Instagram post from this area…

Our first backpacking trip to the Rockies; indeed our first hiking experience in the Rockies (though not our first sight of them – we rode the Rocky Mountaineer train from Calgary to Vancouver when we first immigrated to Canada). And what a way to start, with one of the highest-rated trips from the book “Don’t Waste Your Time in the Canadian Rockies” (one of my favourite guide books ever written).

We were fortunate with the weather for our first couple of days with clear blue skies (if chilly nights) which meant we had the rare treat of seeing the summit of Mt Robson (also sometimes referred to as the King of the Rockies) free of cloud. This photo was taken on our second day on a short hike up past Toboggan Falls to visit the cave. Just an incredible view. We sat and admired it for quite some time before heading back down to the Hargreaves Shelter for dinner.

For the full photographic experience, check out the full set on Flickr.

I really can’t believe it’s been a whole decade since we hiked this trail. Like so many of the beautiful places we’ve visited, I want to return to this area and explore it some more. There’s always next year…

A week of glacier lilies

A departure from the usual posting style. Since I saw so many glacier lilies at the weekend, I figured it would be best to combine all those photographs into a single, all-encompassing glacier lily entry. Let the floral overload begin!

We spent the weekend in Manning Park, and found – to my delight – that the glacier lilies were out in force. Here’s one of many in bud we saw last Sunday near Blackwall Peak, beautifully decorated with raindrops. I was surprised to see them blooming even by the roadside on the way up to Blackwall Peak, and we were further surprised by two yearling bear cubs darting across the road ahead of us!

It's that time of year again! The glacier lilies are out in force in Manning Park and should be good for another couple of weeks. Here's one of many in bud we saw yesterday near Blackwall Peak, beautifully decorated with raindrops (as was our tent!). After all the hard work we put in on Saturday to find some (which paid off handsomely I should add), I was surprised to see them blooming at the roadside on the way up to Blackwall Peak. Then we were surprised again by two yearling bear cubs darting across the road ahead of us 🐻 🐻 πŸ™‚ Hike reports are on LiveTrails. What a weekend! #glacierlily #erythroniumgrandiflorum #ManningPark #manningparkresort #ecmanningprovincialpark #bcparks #paintbrushnaturetrail #explorebc #wildflowers #beautifulbc #beautifulbritishcolumbia #ifttt #hikebc #bchiking

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On Saturday we hiked the Skyline I loop, a 21-km hike with 900+ m of elevation gain. We’d been happily enjoying the wealth of blooms along the trail, but then we entered the last big meadow before turning back towards the car. This might be the most spectacular glacier lily meadow I’ve seen so far! Wow!

A trail runs through it – the path through the vast meadow in the previous photo is barely a boot wide, the glacier lilies and spring beauty doing their best to recolonize it. I looked back at photos I took of this section of the trail in August 2007 and there is no sign of glacier lilies anywhere.

And yet more glacier lilies along the Skyline I trail. There was still a bit of snow in places along the ridge but it’ll soon be gone. I find it amazing how so many can grow and yet all signs of their existence disappear once the main summer bloom gets underway. I’m convinced that most hikers never even see a glacier lily over the summer.

Finally, it’s Flashback-Friday, and I thought I’d finish this week of glacier lily photos with the flower that started it all – my very first glacier lily photo from way back in 2006!

That last shot has a lot to answer for…