Phone Friday IX

It’s Friday again so here’s another selection of phone photos for a very frosty Phone Friday, aka Frosty Friday or even Frosty Phone Friday! These were all taken sometime in the past two weeks as we encountered winter on various hikes in northern Washington and BC.

Winter is doing its best to make its presence felt, although it hasn’t really succeeded up to now. The upside to that is we’ve easily been able to access quite a few hikes without the need of our snowshoes and without risk of avalanches.

  1. At the end of our hike on the Chain Lakes circuit, we stopped off at the famous Picture Lake to see if we could catch any sunset light on Mount Shuksan. For the briefest moment we could see the faintest glimmer of light on Shuksan’s peaks and I quickly took a few shots. By the time I looked up again the light had gone.
  2. It’s hard to make out in this photo but I took it because the ice had formed a shape a bit like a duck’s or a swan’s head.
  3. Along the trail to Heliotrope Ridge we had to cross a couple of mostly frozen creeks, which was much easier than I’ve read it can be in summer. The creeks were still running beneath the ice, and in places the flowing water could be seen through gaps. It was the gaps that interested me, providing a contrasting background that highlighted the shapes along their edge.
  4. The Coleman Glacier greets you at the end of the Heliotrope Ridge trail, a stunning blue and white mass of ice and snow fractured into dozens of deep crevasses. We didn’t have the best light owing to our late-ish start but the blue of the crevasse walls was still intense.
  5. Our third hike in the Mount Baker area took us up to Yellow Aster Butte, a place we’d visited on a beautiful autumn day back in 2010. This time we had the trail entirely to ourselves and enjoyed the hike up as far as this view of the summit of Yellow Aster Butte and the Border Peaks. What can’t be seen in this photo is the freezing gale-force wind whipping the snow around our ankles and taking our breath away. A few quick photos and it was time to hastily retrace our steps.
  6. About 40 minutes after setting off on the trail to Elfin Lakes, the trail passes a creek cascading down a short rock face. I call the lower section of this cascade Zig-Zag Falls due to the way the water is diverted this way then that by the angled rock. Unsurprisingly, the edges of the creek were adorned with ice that nicely framed the moving water.
  7. In the frozen puddles in the ditch alongside the trail, needles of ice had formed overlapping patterns as they grew towards the centre. In this puddle, they hadn’t quite met in the middle, the thinner ice allowing some contrast into the scene. Perhaps my favourite photo of the day.
  8. Both Elfin Lakes had frozen over, but it looked like someone had been throwing rocks in while the ice was thickening, creating an ice crater complete with rim and ejecta. Of course, it could be that the rock has been there for some time and the pattern reflects the manner in which the ice froze. Who knows?
  9. Last but not least, this is one of my favourite views of the Garibaldi massif from Elfin Lakes. In summer, a calm day offers up a perfect reflection of the mountain. Today we had a mix of clear ice and “frosted” ice giving a two-tone reflection. It’s hard to believe from this angle, but the dominant peak is actually lower than the summit of Mount Garibaldi itself, that tooth-like peak to its right.
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Scenes from a hike I

Views from the Chief – a selection of sights from last Friday’s hike in warm November sunshine with a freezing November wind.

The last day of my week off work and I joined a couple of friends for a quick sunny day-hike. (Or is that a quick sunny-day hike?) The Chief seemed like the perfect option – great views, not too long, not too tough.

  1. Garibaldi reflections – I had to lie down on the rock to get low enough for the reflection to show up, which was a little daunting as the wind was really strong, and about 10 feet from my feet was the view in the next photo.
  2. Don’t look down! – I think this is the first time I’ve been able to see all the way down to the road from the Chief (apart from the more distant views of Squamish). What made this spot more than a little terrifying was the convex slope of the rock, inviting you closer to the ever-disappearing edge for a better look. The fact that it was windy also didn’t help.
  3. Mamquam framed redux – another view of Mamquam Mountain, this time framed by a pine tree. I think I’ve photographed this tree nearly every time we’ve been to the Second Peak.
  4. Lunch spot views – Third Peak has a small pond surrounded by pines that makes for a lovely lunch spot. Despite the wind, the pond was still and reflected the trees perfectly, Garibaldi and Mamquam shining bright in the distance.
  5. Chains – I like the shape that these chains make on the rock, especially seeing the way they’ve eroded the surface, rendering it with a reddish tinge from rust.
  6. More chains – this is the first encounter with chains when ascending Second Peak the usual way, a welcome guide on this narrow root-filled ramp which can be tricky when wet, as well as a portent of things to come. It’s difficult to show just how steep this section is without someone in the photo, and I don’t recommend attempting it when it’s icy.
  7. Steps down – helpful steps with a twist that caught my eye, especially when viewed from above.
  8. Rock colour – this series of colourful stripes really stood out in the sunshine today. I think I’ve tried to capture it in the past but it’s usually been in deep shadow, or a dull day. I’m very happy to have caught it this time round!

Lastly, I realized that it was almost ten years to the day that I hiked the Chief with my brother when he first came to visit.

The Best View

Mountains, mountains, and yet more mountains! This might be the most amazing view I’ve seen in the Lower Mainland: Sky Pilot, Mt Habrich, Mt Garibaldi, the Tantalus Range, and so many more. Absolutely incredible! And a bit of autumn colour to finish off. Definitely one of my favourite hikes of the year, though not for beginners…! Finished the day at Backcountry Brewing for good beer and pizza.

I don’t know where to begin in trying to describe how it felt to be greeted by the stunning view of Sky Pilot and Mount Habrich when we reached the top of the ridge. It was utterly breathtaking. We had worked hard for those views and it was worth every step; we were running short on time and had we been a bit more conservative we might not have seen them at all! But we took a chance and it paid off, big time! We still made it back down to the gondola in plenty of time too, so we could have explored a bit further. That’ll have to wait until next time.

  1. Sky Pilot – the craggy multiple peaks of the Sky Pilot group, so captivating no matter what angle they’re viewed at. But up close they are simply stunning, and even better from here than on the neighbouring Skyline Ridge.
  2. Mount Habrich – a gorgeous imposing cone of a peak, with slabs of sheer granite on all sides, it’s definitely a climber’s summit. Mount Baker can be seen on the horizon to the right of Habrich; Meslilloet to the left (the nearest glacier to Vancouver).
  3. Mount Garibaldi – a regular sight on this hike, with many opportunities to stop and admire our nearest volcano. Each of those viewpoints would have made a good-enough turnaround point, but we’re so glad we pushed on higher. All the snow coating Garibaldi’s lower flanks two weeks previously (seen on our trip to Watersprite Lake) had melted. I’m sure it’ll get some new snow this week.
  4. Tantalus Range – I really like this angle on the Tantalus Range, and that tree in the middle of the granite bluff is just so photogenic.
  5. Autumn colour – there wasn’t much in the way of colourful shrubbery, but these two bushes were glowing beautifully in the late afternoon sunshine.
  6. A maple avenue – walking back to the car between the gondola and Shannon Falls, we passed through a tunnel of vine and big-leaf maples whose leaves had turned a lovely golden colour. Many leaves had fallen, creating a bright, cheery carpet for us to walk on in the deepening pre-sunset shadow.

Peaceful

A beautifully peaceful hike to Petgill Lake today, with views of the Chief, Garibaldi, and Black Tusk with a nice selection of flowers to keep us company including Columbia lily, Queen’s Cup, coralroot, and pinesap. Petgill Lake itself isn’t much to look at but it is surrounded by gorgeous old-growth forest with a rich understory of berry bushes and young trees.

  1. A cloudy view of the Chief, Howe Sound, Mt Garibaldi, and more. Black Tusk is faintly visible near the upper left. I should have taken this photo on the way up when it was still sunny, but I like the feel of this one as it suits the calm mood of the day.
  2. A massively-multi-headed Columbia lily! We couldn’t believe our eyes when we saw this; many of the lilies had multiple flowers but this one was the most impressive. I suppose the one good thing about the new logging road is the disturbed ground for new growth to find a foothold. In this case, the Columbia lilies are doing quite well.
  3. A few Queen’s cup were in bloom at the edge of a clearcut. It was hard to get a good clear view of them on account of all the debris but I was fortunate to find this little group.
  4. Pink and blue: a pair of nearly-ripe blueberries. We saw a few berries on the bushes near these two and I’m looking forward to them ripening! I like the colour contrast between the two berries and the arrangement: they’re lake a pair of eyes 🙂
  5. Petgill Lake. Meh. Many reports describe it as a pretty little lake, but I beg to differ. It’s alright, but it doesn’t look appealing for a swim, and there are only a couple of spots to get down by the lakeside. Do this hike for the hike, not the lake.
  6. Coralroot – how could I resist? This hike had sooooo much coralroot, but thankfully most of it was past its peak and not worth photographing which saved me a lot of time. (Also most of it was in the shade.) However, I did find some in the sunshine that made for a nice picture.
  7. Yellow coralroot, much rarer but I seem to have seen it on a few hikes already this year. I’ve brightened this photo quite a bit as it was deep in the forest and I deliberately underexposed the shot a little to keep the exposure fast. It’s not pin-sharp but it’s come out quite well for an Instagram-worthy photo.
  8. Pinesap: we saw lots of this today too, and found one area where it was blooming in abundance with more plants flowering than we’ve ever seen on any hike before. Spectacular! Again, most of it was in the shade but one little plant was in bright sunshine long enough for me to get down on my hands and knees to take its picture.

Eye see you…

Ever had that feeling you’re being watched…?

Hiking up to the third peak of the Chief last Saturday, we had cloudless blue skies with endless views all around. Except for Mt Garibaldi, which had two little nebulous eyes keeping watch on all us hikers below. While the light wasn’t great for the photo, I liked its whimsical nature and wasn’t surprised when, a few minutes later, I saw that the clouds had dissipated. That is, until I looked again after another short time had passed only to see two new eyes over the mountain… Spooky? Or just atmospheric physics at work? 🙂

Elfin Shelter

Elfin shelter and Mt Garibaldi as seen in Oct 2004. Seeing this week’s leave-no-trace Tuesday post from happiestoutdoors gave me an idea for what I wanted to say. Backcountry huts are always popular and will only get more so over the winter season. Good hut etiquette is vital in order for 35 or more people to get along in such a small space which means showing some consideration towards your fellow hikers. Go easy on the noise, be aware that some folks are wanting an early start, and make space for others when you’re done cooking and eating. Oh, and don’t pee right outside the cabin!

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Elfin shelter and Mt Garibaldi as seen in Oct 2004. Seeing this week's #leavenotracetuesday post from @happiestoutdoors gave me an idea for what I wanted to say. Backcountry huts are always popular and will only get more so over the winter season. Good hut etiquette is vital in order for 35 or more people to get along in such a small space which means showing some consideration towards your fellow hikers. Go easy on the noise, be aware that some folks are wanting an early start, and make space for others when you're done cooking and eating. Oh, and don't pee right outside the cabin! #LeaveNoTrace #lnt #elfinlakes #wanderungca #elfinshelter #garibaldiprovincialpark #mountgaribaldi #atwellpeak #bcparks #explorebc #beautifulbritishcolumbia #hiking

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It’s hard to believe we’ve been in BC for 12 years now. Twelve years of hiking in the Coast Mountains, and 12 years since we went on our very first hike with Wanderung. Just for fun I counted up the number of times I’ve visited Elfin Lakes. Answer: 10, which means it’s almost an annual trip for me. Oh and I have a confession to make – I didn’t take this photo, Maria did. I was so hot and tired by the time we reached the lakes that all I did was lounge there. 🙂

A dozen years later…

Winter is coming… Garibaldi gets a dusting of fresh snow. Today is 12 years since I first saw this view 🙂

Sometimes things just line up right. Like yesterday’s fine weather and the fact that it was almost 12 years to the day that I first hiked to Elfin Lakes. I couldn’t resist organizing a hike to recreate that first trip – our first proper hike in BC (the Grouse Grind doesn’t count) and our very first hike with Wanderung. I remember feeling a little underwhelmed as the day was hot, the trail was hard and dusty, and we struggled with the distance: my feet were really sore by the end of the day. Twelve years of hiking in BC has me viewing this hike as being pretty easy these days – after all, a couple of years ago we backpacked up to the shelter (11 km) in 3 hours. At night. However, I have come to appreciate this trail more and more over the years for the gentle gradient and expansive views it offers compared with so many of the local trails.