Marmot

When you camp in a marmot’s garden, you have to expect a visit from the landlord… Payment was made in the form of half-a-dozen chunks from the grips of my hiking poles.

We knew there were loads of marmots here, and friends had mentioned how “friendly” they were. On our first night we confidently hung out food bags from a steeply-sloped rock face thinking that they were safe from marmots there. After all, marmots don’t climb rock faces, do they?

Well, the following morning we were relieved to find that our food bags were untouched, but we soon got a lesson in just how well marmots can climb as this guy scampered effortlessly up the very rock face we’d thought was unclimbable. Huh. After that the marmot explored where we were having breakfast and then had a good nose around our friends’ tent – where I managed to capture it for the photo above.

Having earned no food, the marmot wandered off into the rocks and that was the last we saw of it that day. I didn’t take my hiking poles out on the hike and it was only the next morning that I found the grips had quite a few marmot-bite-sized chunks taken out of the foam. All I could think of was how gross it was to have to now use those poles, all covered in marmot spit… Yuck!

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Marmots

A pair of hoary marmots, aka whistlers. Except they don’t really whistle – it’s more like a high-pitched squeal or shriek. Either way, it’s really loud!

Hiking out from Russet Lake in the summer of 2015, we were about to descend into Singing Pass when we spotted a group of marmots close to the trail. We started taking photos while edging nearer (staying on the trail of course), until we got a clear view of these two. Their behaviour looked quite intimate – they went snout-to-snout a couple of times – but it wasn’t clear to me that they were actually a mating pair. I think they were just siblings, but I have to admit this (and one other photo I have of them) does look rather suggestive…

Tekarra and the Marmot

A welcome sight at the end of a long day – hiking below Mt Tekarra towards our campground. Oh and yet another cheeky marmot!

We were so glad to see this view, to be finally done with the long switchbacking trail down from the Skyline. Marmots kept us company, mocking our zig-zagging descent with their ability to trundle straight down the slope. By this stage we’d hiked 16 or so of our 18 km for the day, and we were all pretty tired. But there was one final insult: we reached the trees and could see a sign. We expected it to mark the campground, so imagine our dismay when the sign actually said “no camping”, and the campground was still another km away…!