Phone Friday VII

Another selection of photos for phone Friday or forest Friday or fungus Friday or even frosty Friday (since many of these were taken on our Canada Day hike to Frosty Mountain). Check out the tree you can ride like a fairground carousel pony! I was surprised to see the coral fungus growing already… I couldn’t resist photographing the garbage gobbler at the Hunter Creek rest area 🙂 The last photo is the pall of smoke from the Topanga Cafe fire 😦 a 116-year old building gone.

And that was my week in photos!

View this post on Instagram

Another selection of photos for #phonefriday or #forestfriday or #fungusfriday or even #frostyfriday (since many of these were taken on our Canada Day hike to Frosty Mountain). Check out the tree you can ride like a fairground carousel pony! I was surprised to see the coral fungus growing already… I couldn't resist photographing the garbage gobbler at the Hunter Creek rest area 🙂 The last photo is the pall of smoke from the Topanga Cafe fire 😦 a 116-year old building gone. And that was my week in photos! #frostymountain #manningpark #ecmanningprovincialpark #camping #hiking #bchiking #hikebc #beautifulbritishcolumbia #beautifulbc #explorebc #yourbcparks #garbagegobbler #coralfungus #teampixel #pixel2 #happycanadaday #staircaseofdoom

A post shared by Andy Gibb (@_andy_gibb_) on

  1. Happy Canada Day from the summit of Frosty Mountain! Notice how the flag is totally horizontal? Yeah, it was blowing a frigid gale up there! Thankfully, there’s a low stone wall to shelter behind so we were able to enjoy our lunch in comfort.
  2. Fresh larch needles – I still remember the first time I touched larch needles and how surprised I was that they weren’t like needles at all but were soft and pliant, almost rubbery. I often run a hand over the branches, leaves, or bark of trees but none are like the larch. Even in the autumn as they turn yellow and fall from the tree, they remain so much softer than typical conifer needles.
  3. Sit-upon tree – it just invites being sat on, doesn’t it? And we have 🙂
  4. The tree-clearing crews had recently finished their work and we could smell fresh sawdust as we passed every place fallen trees had been cut. This winter seemed to bring down a lot of trees, but this one caught my eye with its striking asymmetry. Often trees like this are the result of two trunks that have merged, but I’m having a hard time see that in this case. I wonder what caused it to grow in this way? Was it really so much sunnier on the one side?
  5. On the climb up towards Frosty the first view is of the valley containing the Lightning Lakes chain, with Mt Hozameen at the far end. Today the north summit was in the clouds so all that could be seen was the snow field on below. The Skyline I trail (that we hiked last June) is the ridgeline just out of the frame on the right-hand side of the photo. It’s not a spectacular photo but it’s a nice view, and it feels like a just reward for the last hour of forest views.
  6. Car camping – our little backpacking tent sits in the middle of a large gravel pitch at the Mule Deer campground in Manning Park. Such a contrast with many of the setups that occupy so many sites which are often festooned with tarps, or shelters covering the picnic table. Sometimes the space is taken by a large RV, caravan, or trailer, but I prefer our tidier, more compact arrangement. If it rains, we sit in the car to eat 🙂
  7. Staircase of doom – this doesn’t look so doom-like as you descend but after a long uphill slog from Buckhorn Camp on the Heather Trail, this staircase is a bit demoralizing. I saw it nicknamed the “staircase of doom” by some hikers a few years back and the name has stuck with me. In any case its curving path makes for a lovely photo.
  8. Coral fungus – I normally associate these fungi with autumn hiking so I was really surprised to see them pushing up through the soil already. The photo doesn’t really do them justice: it was neat to see how they’d emerged from the ground, and like the larch needles, they looked so fresh. I don’t know if they’re edible but I’m happy to leave them where they grow.
  9. Garbage gobbler – a bear-proof bin painted with a hungry mouth. This is the modern incarnation of the painted bins from the 1950s or 1960s that the BC Ministry of Transportation installed at rest stops and pullouts across the province. I saw an Instagram post from the Ministry that mentioned them again, so I was pleased to find this one at this rest stop. OK it’s not really much of a photo, just one of those interesting things we find on our travels.
  10. Where there’s smoke… Last Friday morning we awoke to the sound of a helicopter buzzing overhead and the smell of smoke in the apartment. We looked outside and saw the pall of smoke from this fire on 4th Avenue. A quick search of Twitter revealed that the building housing the Topanga cafe was on fire. It took most of the day to put it out, after which the building had to be destroyed. I’m sad to see yet another historical building disappear from Vancouver streets. No doubt it’ll be replaced by something faceless in a year or two. Naturally, with it being a restaurant on fire, the first thought is that it started in the kitchen somehow. Sadly, the CBC reported today that it may have been started by something as simple as a discarded cigarette butt. I wish that smokers were more careful in their disposal of cigarette ends but I’ve seen far too many just flick it away, a total failure of imagination and misplaced belief that nothing will come of their actions.

Toppled

A toppled fly agaric mushroom gives a great view of its gills

I’ve tried several times to get a good shot of these mushrooms (or toadstools as we’d call them back in the UK). They’re sprouting up all over the city at the moment in greater numbers than I remember seeing before, which I’m guessing is due to the excessively rainy October we just had. Alas, getting the right angle and getting the camera to focus on the right part of the fungus has proved annoyingly difficult so far. So I was actually quite pleased to find a pair of mushrooms that had been toppled over (or perhaps had fallen on their own) with their gills all lit up in the afternoon sunshine. No issues with depth of field, no issues with the camera focussing somewhere else – just perfect!