Phone Friday VII

Another selection of photos for phone Friday or forest Friday or fungus Friday or even frosty Friday (since many of these were taken on our Canada Day hike to Frosty Mountain). Check out the tree you can ride like a fairground carousel pony! I was surprised to see the coral fungus growing already… I couldn’t resist photographing the garbage gobbler at the Hunter Creek rest area 🙂 The last photo is the pall of smoke from the Topanga Cafe fire 😦 a 116-year old building gone.

And that was my week in photos!

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Another selection of photos for #phonefriday or #forestfriday or #fungusfriday or even #frostyfriday (since many of these were taken on our Canada Day hike to Frosty Mountain). Check out the tree you can ride like a fairground carousel pony! I was surprised to see the coral fungus growing already… I couldn't resist photographing the garbage gobbler at the Hunter Creek rest area 🙂 The last photo is the pall of smoke from the Topanga Cafe fire 😦 a 116-year old building gone. And that was my week in photos! #frostymountain #manningpark #ecmanningprovincialpark #camping #hiking #bchiking #hikebc #beautifulbritishcolumbia #beautifulbc #explorebc #yourbcparks #garbagegobbler #coralfungus #teampixel #pixel2 #happycanadaday #staircaseofdoom

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  1. Happy Canada Day from the summit of Frosty Mountain! Notice how the flag is totally horizontal? Yeah, it was blowing a frigid gale up there! Thankfully, there’s a low stone wall to shelter behind so we were able to enjoy our lunch in comfort.
  2. Fresh larch needles – I still remember the first time I touched larch needles and how surprised I was that they weren’t like needles at all but were soft and pliant, almost rubbery. I often run a hand over the branches, leaves, or bark of trees but none are like the larch. Even in the autumn as they turn yellow and fall from the tree, they remain so much softer than typical conifer needles.
  3. Sit-upon tree – it just invites being sat on, doesn’t it? And we have 🙂
  4. The tree-clearing crews had recently finished their work and we could smell fresh sawdust as we passed every place fallen trees had been cut. This winter seemed to bring down a lot of trees, but this one caught my eye with its striking asymmetry. Often trees like this are the result of two trunks that have merged, but I’m having a hard time see that in this case. I wonder what caused it to grow in this way? Was it really so much sunnier on the one side?
  5. On the climb up towards Frosty the first view is of the valley containing the Lightning Lakes chain, with Mt Hozameen at the far end. Today the north summit was in the clouds so all that could be seen was the snow field on below. The Skyline I trail (that we hiked last June) is the ridgeline just out of the frame on the right-hand side of the photo. It’s not a spectacular photo but it’s a nice view, and it feels like a just reward for the last hour of forest views.
  6. Car camping – our little backpacking tent sits in the middle of a large gravel pitch at the Mule Deer campground in Manning Park. Such a contrast with many of the setups that occupy so many sites which are often festooned with tarps, or shelters covering the picnic table. Sometimes the space is taken by a large RV, caravan, or trailer, but I prefer our tidier, more compact arrangement. If it rains, we sit in the car to eat 🙂
  7. Staircase of doom – this doesn’t look so doom-like as you descend but after a long uphill slog from Buckhorn Camp on the Heather Trail, this staircase is a bit demoralizing. I saw it nicknamed the “staircase of doom” by some hikers a few years back and the name has stuck with me. In any case its curving path makes for a lovely photo.
  8. Coral fungus – I normally associate these fungi with autumn hiking so I was really surprised to see them pushing up through the soil already. The photo doesn’t really do them justice: it was neat to see how they’d emerged from the ground, and like the larch needles, they looked so fresh. I don’t know if they’re edible but I’m happy to leave them where they grow.
  9. Garbage gobbler – a bear-proof bin painted with a hungry mouth. This is the modern incarnation of the painted bins from the 1950s or 1960s that the BC Ministry of Transportation installed at rest stops and pullouts across the province. I saw an Instagram post from the Ministry that mentioned them again, so I was pleased to find this one at this rest stop. OK it’s not really much of a photo, just one of those interesting things we find on our travels.
  10. Where there’s smoke… Last Friday morning we awoke to the sound of a helicopter buzzing overhead and the smell of smoke in the apartment. We looked outside and saw the pall of smoke from this fire on 4th Avenue. A quick search of Twitter revealed that the building housing the Topanga cafe was on fire. It took most of the day to put it out, after which the building had to be destroyed. I’m sad to see yet another historical building disappear from Vancouver streets. No doubt it’ll be replaced by something faceless in a year or two. Naturally, with it being a restaurant on fire, the first thought is that it started in the kitchen somehow. Sadly, the CBC reported today that it may have been started by something as simple as a discarded cigarette butt. I wish that smokers were more careful in their disposal of cigarette ends but I’ve seen far too many just flick it away, a total failure of imagination and misplaced belief that nothing will come of their actions.
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Phone Friday II

Another batch of photos from the past week for phone-Friday – watching the trillium change colour, the first violet, dogwood, camas buds, blossom, the last of the blue sky, and trees galore

  1. Western trillium does this neat thing where the petals change colour as they age. For years I thought there were two species with different colours until I read about that in our plant book.
  2. This photo shows a group of trillium with fresh and older blooms. It’s rare to find such a dense group of trillium in the wild so I’m happy to keep taking pictures of all the flowers in this little native plant garden.
  3. The first of the Alaska violets has bloomed in the patch of ground near my office. They’re hard to capture with the phone as I need to get down low to frame up the photo, and I have to try at the right time of day to avoid casting a shadow across them.
  4. The dogwood blooms are coming along nicely! I check on them every day as they’re right outside the entrance to the School of Population and Public Health.
  5. It’s nice to see that the camas buds are beginning to show hints of blue, and I’m hoping to see the first flowers emerge next week after the warm sunshine we’ve had recently.
  6. The wind picked up towards the end of the day, Friday, blowing thousands of cherry blossom petals from the trees. I was struck by the contrast between the fresh pink and the grey of the concrete, as well as the line of the kerb, and it was nice to capture them while they were fresh.
  7. Friday morning was a lovely warm sunny morning, the first day where it almost felt like summer. With classes ended, the UBC campus feels so much more peaceful and I took advantage to capture this view of the Musqueam double-headed serpent post reflected in the still water. You’ll have to take my word for it about the reflection as it had to be left out of the square crop for Instagram.
  8. We went for a walk in Pacific Spirit Park last weekend and enjoyed the sunshine streaming through the forest of tall trees. I really like this effect of the trees filling all the available space even though the forest was bright and open where we were standing. (It reminded me a bit of the Olbers’ Paradox in astronomy, although it’s not really a valid comparison.) The original photo had quite strong perspective effects on the tree trunks so I used DxO’s geometry corrections to straighten the trees and give the photo the appearance I was after.

That’s it for this week. We’ll see what photo-opportunities the next seven days brings… I’ll try to write up the blog post on time too, which means posting the photos on Instagram a little earlier than 11 pm!

Forest light

Forest light: morning sunshine streaming through the trees picks out some young hemlocks on our way up Mt Gardner

Recently I’ve been enjoying Adam Gibbs’s YouTube channel and his exploration of the coastal rain forest of south-western BC. One of his main talking points is light. I’ve known good light is critical for good photographs but his discussion of some of the more subtle aspects of light has had me looking anew at various scenes.

Now let’s face it, the sunshine lighting up the young hemlocks is pretty obvious but having watched Adam’s videos and seen how he uses light in his photographs I immediately saw this as an opportunity to put into practice some of what I’ve been watching. I really like the contrast in light, but also the contrast in texture: the small, bright green hemlocks against the darker background of mature tree trunks. The diagonal trunk also adds an extra element, and the new ability to make local adjustments in DxO meant I could tone down the brightest highlights and preserve a more realistic look.

Overall I’m really happy with this photo and it’s inspired me to look for more scenes like this as we get our hiking season under way.

Petrified

A different kind of forest for forest Friday – the fallen logs of the Petrified Forest National Park. These stone logs messed with my perception: looks like wood, feels like rock. I’d love to go back and spend more time exploring the park when it wasn’t so chilly (taken in Dec 2013)!

The petrified forest was a place I’d wanted to visit ever since I was about 6 or 7 years old and I first learned about fossils and petrified trees. That dream came true just under four years ago and I have to say the experience was even better than I expected. The location is unreal: high, open desert which, at an altitude of 1700 m (5600 ft), is far from warm in December (there was snow in shaded areas). The logs – mostly fragments as the rock is extremely brittle – lie all around having emerged from sediments now washed away. In places, the end of a stone log pokes out of the landscape.

The biggest surprise for me was the disconnect between my senses of sight and touch. To look at some of the pieces, my brain said “wood”, yet the moment my fingers touched the cold stone, I only saw rock. I went back and forth several times, and it was like one of those perspective puzzles where you see a view that changes in time depending on how you concentrate on it.

I loved it. And being such a clear sunny day I was able to use the polarizer to maximum effect to enhance the colour and contrast. The bigger challenge was finding a composition that captured both the wonderful old trees and the sense of openness, almost desolation. I’ve just looked back through the full album on Flickr and I think we did OK.