Chipmunk

It’s been a few years since I saw this view – could be time to go back. Chipmunk Peak as seen from the Tenquille-Finch Ridge col. Look at that lovely expanse of green meadows; imagine the flowers…

Tenquille Lake was the first place we took our new-to-us SUV, a ’99 Honda CR-V, back in 2011. I still remember the elation of getting through the first water bar that would have stopped our previous car. I also remember the sounds of hitting the underside of the car on rocks, of scraping the mud-flaps going through water bars, and of alder tickling the paintwork. That last one in particular is a sound I never get used to. Real nails-on-a-blackboard stuff.

But we made it to the trailhead, where we were immediately set upon by hordes of mosquitoes. Thankfully they tapered off once we started hiking. Looking back, I realized that we did this hike on August 20th, and there were still glacier lilies blooming, so if we go back in the near future there’s every chance that I’ll be able add to my already-bulging glacier lily photo collection for 2017! Oh yeah, blah blah mountains, views etc.

The subject of this photo, Chipmunk Peak, is accessed via a different logging road, and is, by all accounts, a relatively easy scramble with superb views. Plus the meadows look spectacular. Maybe later this summer…

A week of glacier lilies

A departure from the usual posting style. Since I saw so many glacier lilies at the weekend, I figured it would be best to combine all those photographs into a single, all-encompassing glacier lily entry. Let the floral overload begin!

We spent the weekend in Manning Park, and found – to my delight – that the glacier lilies were out in force. Here’s one of many in bud we saw last Sunday near Blackwall Peak, beautifully decorated with raindrops. I was surprised to see them blooming even by the roadside on the way up to Blackwall Peak, and we were further surprised by two yearling bear cubs darting across the road ahead of us!

It's that time of year again! The glacier lilies are out in force in Manning Park and should be good for another couple of weeks. Here's one of many in bud we saw yesterday near Blackwall Peak, beautifully decorated with raindrops (as was our tent!). After all the hard work we put in on Saturday to find some (which paid off handsomely I should add), I was surprised to see them blooming at the roadside on the way up to Blackwall Peak. Then we were surprised again by two yearling bear cubs darting across the road ahead of us 🐻 🐻 🙂 Hike reports are on LiveTrails. What a weekend! #glacierlily #erythroniumgrandiflorum #ManningPark #manningparkresort #ecmanningprovincialpark #bcparks #paintbrushnaturetrail #explorebc #wildflowers #beautifulbc #beautifulbritishcolumbia #ifttt #hikebc #bchiking

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On Saturday we hiked the Skyline I loop, a 21-km hike with 900+ m of elevation gain. We’d been happily enjoying the wealth of blooms along the trail, but then we entered the last big meadow before turning back towards the car. This might be the most spectacular glacier lily meadow I’ve seen so far! Wow!

A trail runs through it – the path through the vast meadow in the previous photo is barely a boot wide, the glacier lilies and spring beauty doing their best to recolonize it. I looked back at photos I took of this section of the trail in August 2007 and there is no sign of glacier lilies anywhere.

And yet more glacier lilies along the Skyline I trail. There was still a bit of snow in places along the ridge but it’ll soon be gone. I find it amazing how so many can grow and yet all signs of their existence disappear once the main summer bloom gets underway. I’m convinced that most hikers never even see a glacier lily over the summer.

Finally, it’s Flashback-Friday, and I thought I’d finish this week of glacier lily photos with the flower that started it all – my very first glacier lily photo from way back in 2006!

That last shot has a lot to answer for…

A bear walks into a bar…

Waiting for service… Flashback Friday to May 2007 and a road trip to Port Renfrew, where we rounded a bend and spotted this bear wandering along the shoulder. He (?) stopped to check us out, placed his paws on the barrier as if waiting for a drink, before getting up onto the barrier and walking along it for a moment until startled back into the forest by the next car.

We’d just bought our shiny new compact superzoom Canon S3IS and I was more than happy to make use of the long zoom to get this photo. Sadly, once I got home and looked at the photos on our computer monitor, this photo also alerted me to how bad the colour fringing was on high-contrast edges (look at the edge of the road for an example – and that’s after a bit of processing). A lot of it can be taken out with “purple fringing” corrections, but it’s hard to get rid of all of it. Sure, I’d read the reviews that mentioned this aberration, and figured I could live with it. Looking back, that was really the time we should have gone straight to buying an SLR, instead of making-do with the inferior compact camera image quality.

But, having said all that, I still really like this and the other photos I took at the time. It’s quite the memory, and possibly our most fun bear encounter.

Telescopes in the desert

Flashback-Friday to that time I went for a job interview… May 2003.

I first visited the Very Large Array (VLA) in 1996 and immediately fell in love with the desert. Fast forward a few years and I found myself in Socorro interviewing for a job that – unfortunately – disappeared in the time between arranging the travel for the interview and turning up at the door of the NRAO building. In the days before the ubiquity of cell phones, my would-be interviewers could only leave voicemail on my work phone while I was away on holiday (exploring the National Parks of the Sierra Nevada), so it was only when I read my work email just before I left for Albuquerque that I found out. Disappointed, I still went if only to meet the folks there and catch up with one of my colleagues about a project we were working on.

Of course, given a few days there, I couldn’t resist driving out to see the telescope array itself. It’s a fun drive and I remember seeing pronghorn along the way. On arrival, I checked in with the operators and let them know I’d be wandering around taking photos. Thankfully, the array was in one of its more compact configurations so I was able to size up this shot with multiple telescopes in the frame. Looking back at the photos I got that day (with our first distinctly-crappy digital camera, too), I think this is the best of the bunch.

If I remember rightly I enjoyed some good pizza and fine local beer that night!

Long exposure

Alpenglow. Flashback Friday to a Thanksgiving 2012 backpacking trip to Garibaldi Lake.

I couldn’t think what to post today, but I have had this photo in mind for a while now. It didn’t feel like a floral-Friday so I went with “flashback” instead. The summer of 2012 was a good one for us when it came to camping. I think we spent over 20 nights in our new tent as the backpacking season lasted until Thanksgiving in October. For the weekend, we called out a hike through Wanderung and headed up to Garibaldi Lake with a couple of fellow hikers.

The weather was perfect, and we enjoyed two lovely evenings by the lake watching the daylight fade. I was even inspired to take some long exposure photos of the lake to smooth out the ripples and get this nice reflection of the distant glaciers catching the last light of the day. Alas I totally missed the superb auroral display that graced the skies on the night we drove home…

Snow in the city

White out. Is it really a Flashback Friday if it was only last week? After a few days of very welcome sunshine, we’re back to views like this, even in the city!

It’s been a couple of years since we had snow in the city, and I must admit I haven’t missed it one bit! Still, it was kinda nice to watch the snow fall in great big flakes, and pile up in soft layers on our patio table and in the trees. It was even fun to walk out in it for a while, although it did get a bit wet later in the day. So I figured that this photo from last Friday when Brenda and I went snowshoeing up at Mt Seymour was quite appropriate, as the view in the city was very similar to this!

Brandywine Glacier

Another angle on the Brandywine Glacier from last Friday.

I’ve been following the progress of photographer Quentin Lake as he hikes the entire coastline of Britain, and I’ve really enjoyed seeing his photographs and what he makes of the landscape (and seascape) around him. His ability to find interesting shapes and patterns has inspired me to look for similar things when I’m outdoors. In particular he frequently manages to find angles and intersecting lines that make for visually striking photos. This photo of the edge of Brandywine Mountain and the glacier below is my attempt to mimic this style. It’s not perfect (the shadows are a bit distracting in my view), but I’m still pretty happy with it.