Revolutum

A plethora of pink fawn lilies for fawn-lily Friday! So happy to find some as they’re very rare on the mainland. A big thank you to bustapbj for pointing me in the right direction 👍👍

Pink fawn lilies (Erythronium revolutum) are very rare on the mainland: I’ve seen only a single one in Lighthouse Park, a few on the UBC campus, and a handful more at the UBC Botanical Garden. So I was really looking forward to our visit to Vancouver Island, and to the Port Renfrew area in particular, where I’d seen a couple of photos showing pink fawn lilies at the base of a large tree. One of my Instagram friends let me know of another site where I might find them, which we drove past multiple times and every time I couldn’t see where they might be hiding.

But Sombrio Beach had a surprise waiting for me with a small area of pink lilies, some of which – alas – had been trampled carelessly. I picked my way through the tangle of salmonberry to find a nice spot with a few flowers in a photogenic arrangement. If those were all I’d seen I’d have to admit that they would do, I guess, though I was still thinking about trying to find this other spot.

On our last day, as we were driving back to take the ferry home, we drove past the “secret” spot one last time and I decided that it was now or never. Leaving Maria in the car with her book, I ran off in one direction. Nothing. I ran back past the car, saw a short trail disappear into the forest and took it. The environment looked ideal, but the only flowers were trillium (which, of course, I did stop to photograph as well…) and false lily-of-the-valley (which I did not, on account of not seeing a good composition).

Returning to the road, I crossed over and followed a different trail down a small embankment into what I thought would be a scruffy area (if not outright dumping ground as it was next to the road). I could not have been more wrong. Here, in all their glory, was the biggest patch of pink fawn lilies I had ever seen. It was stunning! Knowing we were short of time, I hurriedly snapped a few photos, not really taking the time to find good compositions. I ran back to the car and breathlessly told Maria all about them, and decided we had enough time for me to drive the 100 m back to that spot and show her. It was worth it 🙂

So, many thanks Shane – you were absolutely 100% right!

On a final, completely unrelated note, the “revolutum” part of their name instantly brings to mind the Queensryche album “Operation: Mindcrime” and, in particular, the song “Revolution Calling” which I will forever more think of as “Revolutum Calling”. Which they will do every spring.

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Misty Mountain Monday

Misty mountain Monday – views of the Stawamus Chief, showers in the Squamish Valley, and a suggestion of snowy peaks hidden in the clouds across Howe Sound.

Sometimes you have to get out hiking whatever the weather, and on this day we had plenty of weather! Winter wasn’t done with us yet, and we ended the day walking in wet snow. Still, swirly clouds make for interesting views along the way.

The first photo is overlooking the gap between the first and second peaks of the Chief, where we can see the Squamish Valley beyond and the way up towards Whistler. I snapped it from the gondola on our descent, and I like how the view is sandwiched between the clouds.

The second photo shows a similar view, though just looking down into the valley: I like how the light was catching the two parallel roads pointing northwards up the valley, and how the view becomes obscured by the rain showers.

The third photo was taken from the patio at the upper gondola station and at first glance might not appear to be very striking. But I really like the subtlety of the snowy mountain barely visible through the clouds. I tried to make it noticeable but not too obvious in the processing and I’m not sure it entirely worked. However, I still like it because it reminds me of the day and how there wasn’t even this much of a view when we first reached the top!

Island flowers

Wildflower season is upon us! I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to seek out spring flowers on Vancouver Island last weekend. Of course I knew there’d be white fawn lilies, trillium, and skunk cabbage and I was hoping to find shooting stars and common camas. But the highlight was all the gorgeous little satin flowers, which I’d never even heard of until I saw bustapbj’s posts. And – oh wow – are they ever beautiful!

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Wildflower season is upon us! I couldn't pass up the opportunity to seek out spring flowers on Vancouver Island last weekend. Of course I knew there'd be white fawn lilies, trillium, and skunk cabbage and I was hoping to find shooting stars and common camas. But the highlight was all the gorgeous little satin flowers, which I'd never even heard of until I saw @bustapbj's posts. And – oh wow – are they ever beautiful! #wildflowerwednesday #wildflowers #whitefawnlily #erythroniumoregonum #trillium #shootingstars #satinflower #skunkcabbage #commoncamas #olsyniumdouglasii #purpleeyedgrass #goldstreamprovincialpark #mountfinlayson #explorevi #explorebc #yourbcparks #beautifulbc #beautifulbritishcolumbia

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Of course, “last weekend” was back at the beginning of April, when the first wave of wildflowers began to bloom. Despite the threat of rain, I was still able to head to Goldstream Provincial Park and hike up Mount Finlayson in search of a few of my favourite spring flowers. The fawn lilies were well in bloom on the southern side of the park, and only just in bud on the northern slopes of the mountain, so I got to see all stages of their growth (which I always enjoy). The bonus was seeing the trillium and fawn lilies together in a sea of white and green.

Once up into the Garry oak meadows, the shooting stars took over, and I was surprised to find the camas was only just coming into bud. Again, on the north side of Mount Finlayson, I found a couple of small clearings which were covered in the leaves and early buds of shooting stars: they must have looked great a couple of weeks after my visit! There were more fawn lilies, though none were in photographically-favourable places.

As mentioned above, the real treat was seeing satin flowers for the first time, and what gorgeous little flowers they are! And so well-named: the petals really do look like magenta satin. They were more or less at the end of their bloom so I hope I can catch them earlier next year. I don’t feel that my photos really captured them very well, so I would definitely appreciate another chance to check them out.

Lastly, the section of the road just before getting back to the car had some wonderful patches of bright skunk cabbage flowers.

As for the hike itself, it’s well worth doing though the views from the top are quite distant and the nearby development on Bear Mountain is a bit of an eyesore. I’m not sure I’d repeat the loop I walked: the route down the north side isn’t very interesting, and it ends with a few km of road walking. Still, it wasn’t all bad: at least there were more flowers along a few stretches of the road.

Tantalus Views

A mellow hike to ease into the season, the highlights are definitely the views of the Tantalus Range but the trail also passes through some nice forest.

It’s the end of March, and we’re really feeling out of shape when it comes to hiking. As such, we’re starting slowly but surely to build up to the summer hiking season with a mix of easy-to-moderate hikes. After doing so much hiking on snow over the winter, it definitely feels good to be on solid ground again! We’ve done the Brohm Lake Interpretive Forest loop a couple of times before and really enjoyed, so it seemed like a suitable choice for warming up our legs again.

One of the best features of this hike is the exceptional views of the Tantalus Range, as seen in the first three photos. The third is annotated using the PeakFinder app which is very handy for when you simply must know what the peaks are called! Another good view is of Cloudburst Mountain seen from the bridge at the south end of the lake. Strangely, I don’t remember seeing that view before so it was a nice surprise, especially with Cloudburst reflected in the perfectly-calm lake.

But it’s not all about the views. The trail wanders through a mixture of forest – sometimes open and airy, other times darker and more enclosed – past some fine cedars and Douglas firs, and has a few gorgeous rocky bluffs overlooking the lake which would make great sunbathing spots. It’s a popular lake for swimming in the summer but I’m not much of a swimmer, and it never looks appealing to me.

So there you go, a few photos of our hike. Nothing earth-shattering, just a nice day out.

Frozen

Couldn’t resist stopping off at Alexander Falls after a couple of hours snowshoeing the trails at the Whistler Olympic Park. Unfortunately we ran out of time and had to make do with the view from the parking lot instead of getting down to river level. Hard to believe there’s a creek under there!

With our prolonged spell of fine, cold weather, we knew that the local waterfalls were mostly frozen over. Our original plan was to take in the trail that ventures to the base of Alexander Falls, but our desire to explore new trails got the better of us and we wandered up the slopes and through the forests of the west side of the Whistler Olympic Park instead. That meant we ran out of time before getting to Alexander Falls, so we had to be content with parking up on our way back and doing the short (but treacherous) walk across the snow-buried parking lot.

It was an impressive sight, the falls almost completely frozen over with only the smallest sign of running water. It definitely would have been worth exploring the bottom of the falls, as I’d done with a friend on a previous visit, but we’ll just have to wait until next winter.

I also realized that one problem with photographing the waterfall this late in the day meant that it was partially in shadow; it would be better to catch it either in full sun or full shade rather than have to deal with the large difference in brightness between the shady waterfall and the sunlit snow. Something to remember next time!

Waiting for sunset

Waiting for sunset on Black Mountain, a good little hike for when you’re getting over a cold. Plus we got to hang out with creeks.and.peaks and her pup Abby – we were all a little chilly by the time we headed back down!

We didn’t get out hiking at all in February, and we paid for it towards the end of the month when we were both struck down with colds. That knocked us out of action for a couple of weeks, and today’s hike was our first attempt at some exercise in well over a month. I struggled on the ascent, stopping often to do battle with a fit of coughing, the cold air and exertion threatening to stop me in my tracks.

Thankfully we had chosen a short hike, and we eventually levelled off on the Black Mountain plateau. As we wandered up to the north summit I recognized Ngaio whom we’d met at Keith’s Hut back in September 2016. We stopped to chat and swap stories of our respective colds.

While the sun was shining, the air was cool and we discussed the possibility of hanging around for an hour to catch the sunset. Somehow we all thought it was worth doing and so we wiled away the time taking photos, chatting, and commiserating with a shivering Abby – poor thing! When the time came, the clouds cleared and the snow turned pink-ish. The colours weren’t very strong, especially to the eye, and by now we were all cold – I was also shivering and having a hard time holding the camera still having decided to leave the tripod at home – and I’m not sure anyone thought it was actually worth our time.

However, when I looked at the photos at home I was pleasantly surprised at how well they turned out. The three above are all square crops from photos taken with my phone (my preferred source for Instagram) and I really like them all. The light in the first one is just lovely, the pink light on the trees looks stunning in the second, while the last light is cast across the uppermost slopes of the mountains in the third. I must admit I’ve gone back to look at these photos multiple times even before I posted them on Instagram.

Expansive peace

A few throwback-Thursday favourites from our Heather Trail backpacking trip last September. A great hike to soak up some wide open alpine space and big skies…

Our decision to hike the Heather Trail on the Labour Day weekend was made as we approached Hope along Highway 1. Do we take the turnoff and continue into the Fraser Canyon towards the Stein Valley, or head for the alpine of the Heather Trail? In the end the weather looked good enough for a few days of alpine enjoyment, and so we continued on to Highway 3 and into Manning Park.

It turned out to be an inspired move. We set off under cool, cloudy skies and began our 12 km hike in to Kicking Horse campground. Late afternoon sunshine caught up with us near the final pass, bathing the meadows in warm light (photos 1 and 2) for some wonderful scenes. These two photos are among my favourites from the entire trip.

We found a suitable spot for our tent and enjoyed as quiet a night as we’ve ever experienced in the backcountry with not even the slightest breeze to ripple the fly sheet. I remember lying in my sleeping bag, probably around 1 or 2 am, holding my breath and enjoying the sheer weight of the silence.

The next day we hauled ourselves off in the direction of Nicomen Lake for a day’s hiking. We passed through more expansive meadows below azure skies, meeting barely a handful people along the way. (At least, until the ridge above Nicomen Lake itself.) We enjoyed lunch on a peak high above the lake (photo 3) before retracing our steps.

The light was perfect on our return, though we could see the beginnings of some dramatic clouds over the summit of Third Brother (fourth photo), portents of the weather to come that night and the following morning. The square format of this photo doesn’t really do justice to the size of the meadows we were passing through.

As we neared the campground we opted to pick our way carefully across country to the windy summit of Fourth Brother (photo 5) to enjoy a view we hadn’t experienced before. Then back to the tent, a rainy night followed by a snowy morning, and a steady hike back to the car.

It was only three days but it was some of the most enjoyable hiking and camping we’ve had, adding to some of the best hiking and camping we’d already savoured over the summer. Gambling on the Heather Trail was definitely the right decision.