Reflecting mountains

Mt Chephren reflected in Lower Waterfowl Lake. After I posted my third photo last week, I thought I was done with this view. Not so! I found yet another photo, this one taken the morning after the previous sunset shots. But I think thisโ€‹ is definitely the last ๐Ÿ™‚

No sooner had I posted my photo last week, and declared it my last of Mt Chephren, I found myself poring over the photos from that same 2009 trip to the Rockies only to come face-to-face with yet another picture of this mountain and the lake. It’s pretty obvious why I took it – a mirror-calm lake and morning sunshine on the mountains. Postcard material really.

One thing that doesn’t come across in any of the photos of Mt Chephren is its scale. With the camera at its widest viewing angle (equivalent to 28 mm), the top of the mountain and the tip of its reflection don’t quite fit into the frame. And of course there’s nothing else in the photo to lend a sense of scale. That’s the frustration with mountain photography. All too often you get a lovely photograph of some scenery, but without a sense of really being there, or an idea of how imposing the mountains are.

I think of photos of Garibaldi Lake in particular. When you’re at the lake, the mountains and glaciers on the far side look impressive, despite their distance. But not a single photo of them really captures that feeling. Thinking about what that has in common with the photo above is the fact that they’re mountains on the opposite side of a lake, and those photos are inevitably taken at lake level, reducing the mountains to a two-dimensional backdrop as the third dimension into the scene is compressed.

So what can you do as a photographer? It’s hard to get a human out in the middle of the lake, at least not without ruining the reflection ๐Ÿ˜‰ Getting some height over the lake often helps as it expands the depth of the scene. Or just accept them as they are, and treat them as being the view from a comfortable chair by the side of a lake.

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Chephren at dusk

Take 2 for Mount Chephren, this time at dusk. We were making our way north away from the rain around Banff towards clearer skies in Jasper and the campground at Waterfowl Lakes was the perfect overnight stop for our first dry night in several days.

Another view of Mt Chephren, actually taken before the one I posted last week. Back in 2009, we spent two weeks in the Rockies, the first spent exploring the Mt Assiniboine area, and the second for us to do some touring and day-hiking. The weather had been mixed; we finally got fed up of the rain down in the Banff-Lake Louise area and noticed that things looked better in Jasper. Destination Jasper, then!

We took our time heading north on the gloriously scenic Icefields Parkway, stopping off at the viewpoints and fitting in a quick hike to Helen Lake. Along the way we cased out a few campgrounds before settling in for a comfortable and – more importantly – dry night at Waterfowl Lakes. The clouds drifted away, the skies cleared and sat outside for the first time in what felt like ages!

Photogenic

Mt Chephren looking very photogenic above Lower Waterfowl Lake. Or should that be Lower Waterfowl Lake looking very photogenic below Mt Chephren?

A classic Rockies scene: a beautiful glacial lake and a striking summit. This photo was taken in 2011 on our tour of Banff and Jasper with my parents, and I think it may have been my Mum’s favourite spot. We had lunch at a picnic table in the campground with this view in front of us. Just beautiful…

I have two more versions of this scene that I’ll post for the next couple of Mountain Mondays.

Becalmed

Beautiful reflections in Maligne Lake

We’ve taken the boat tour on Maligne Lake a couple of times now and I still think it’s worth doing, despite the cost. The highlight is getting to see the famous Spirit Island that adorns the majority of the RVs touring the mountain parks. As we neared this point, the pilot slowed right down and swung the boat round in a big lazy arc so as not to create a wake and disturb this near-perfect reflection. Definitely a big “wow” moment!

Bear crossing

Why did the bear cross the road? Probably to escape the camera-wielding tourists…

Yet another photo from our 2011 visit to the Rockies. We spotted this bear along the road between Jasper and Pyramid Lake, and of course had to pause long enough to get a photo or two. While it looks like the bear is crossing the road, it’s actually walking through an empty parking lot so there was a good distance between us. It looked our way for a few seconds before taking off into the forest.

Elk!

Elk! Mum and Dad’s first (but definitely not the last) wildlife sighting in the Rockies back in 2011.

After collecting Mum and Dad in Canmore, we headed back to Johnston Canyon where we were staying in one of the cabins. Of course we had to take the quieter Bow Valley Parkway just in case there was any wildlife to spot. And sure enough, we rounded a bend and we saw a few cars pulled over. My first reaction was “bear jam!” and I was delighted at the prospect of my parents seeing a bear within minutes of being in the Rockies. Ah well, it was “just” an elk. But what an elk! A huge bull with an impressive rack of antlers. And it was more than content to let us take photos while it munched away on the grass at the side of the road. A pretty good start to the holiday!

Tekarra and the Marmot

A welcome sight at the end of a long day – hiking below Mt Tekarra towards our campground. Oh and yet another cheeky marmot!

We were so glad to see this view, to be finally done with the long switchbacking trail down from the Skyline. Marmots kept us company, mocking our zig-zagging descent with their ability to trundle straight down the slope. By this stage we’d hiked 16 or so of our 18 km for the day, and we were all pretty tired. But there was one final insult: we reached the trees and could see a sign. We expected it to mark the campground, so imagine our dismay when the sign actually said “no camping”, and the campground was still another km away…!