Phone Friday VIII

It’s been a while since I did a Phone Friday post, so here’s a selection of photos I liked from the past week, including some from our hike last Saturday, a walk down to Tower Beach (including a fogbow!), Monday’s moonrise, and some nice afternoon light through the leaves.

  1. The Chief and the Tantalus Range above the Squamish River valley – the more I look at this photo, the more I like it. It’s such an incredible view to be so high above the Chief, itself such an imposing mountain from the valley floor, and I find my eye is naturally drawn across to the pointy summits of the Tantalus Range.
  2. Bendy trees – we had just levelled off beneath this cliff face when Maria called to me to look up. I’m glad I did as these Douglas firs are amazing! I love the way they curve out over the cliff before turning upwards. And the four together look like they started growing at about the same time.
  3. Half-and-half tree – this tree is a lodgepole pine on the open bluffs and I was struck by the fact that one half is completely dead while the other is doing just fine with a well-established crown of pine needles. Not only that but the symmetry of the branches is also evident. It’s hard to say what may have caused one side to die off, but perhaps a lightning strike?
  4. Mushrooms galore – I was really pleased to find a few tree stumps festooned with these little mushrooms. I haven’t taken many fungus photos this autumn, it feels like there haven’t been as many on the trails. On the other hand, I’ve seen plenty on Instagram so they are definitely out there…
  5. Dew on redwood sorrel – a group of us at work decided to walk down to Tower Beach while the weather was fine. Along the way I noticed this patch of redwood sorrel (note: must come back next year when it’s in flower), a few of the leaves still covered in droplets of either dew or water from the university’s irrigation system. Either way they looked really striking.
  6. Snowberries – I still think of my photo-a-day project when I see snowberries. I tried many times to get a good photo of them and failed every time. Thanks to the wide aperture and computing power behind the phone camera, all I needed to do was to get the camera to focus on the desired spot and then just tap the button. Just like that, I have a better photo than any of those I took with our SLR back in 2011-2012!
  7. Fogbow – this is only the second fogbow I’ve ever seen! I wasn’t thinking about how misty it might be down by the water, but as soon as I saw the mist I wondered if we’d see one. Sure enough – it’s only a partial bow, but it’s good enough for me. Awesome!
  8. Moonrise – my phone camera’s view of last Monday’s moonrise. Such a beautifully calm evening…
  9. Afternoon light – Friday afternoon on the UBC campus and the setting sun lit up a couple of trees just outside our building. I ran downstairs to take a few pictures before the light disappeared. I wasn’t particularly enamoured with any of the shots I got, as it didn’t feel like they captured the light or scene as I could see it, but this one’s not bad.
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Mamquam Framed

Mamquam Mountain framed.

The minute I saw Mamquam Mountain over to the east of our lunch spot on an open rocky bluff I knew I had to find a way to capture it. And it didn’t take long. I noticed the tree on the upper right with its arching canopy and decided to make that the top of a frame to give the mountain some context. After all, it’s a long way off (20 km) and while distant mountains are nice to look at, they don’t always make interesting photos.

All that I had to do to complete my framing was to gain a little more height so I could get an unobstructed view the icefield on the mountain. Thankfully it didn’t take much, and I was able to do it safely without venturing anywhere near the steep drop-off. The trees have the added benefit of obscuring some of the logging roads and clearcuts on the intervening slopes.

Back home I knew a square crop would work. Apart from that, the only other change I made was to apply a warming filter to the shady part of the rock to take out some of the blue in the shadows. Very simple, and I’m really happy with the result.

Happy day

Happy International Mountain Day! Mountains make me happy, and I suppose these mountains are international if you don’t live in Canada, so yeah – enjoy the day! I know that I certainly enjoyed this view of the Tantalus Range from Al’s Habrich Ridge trail 🏔🗻🌋

It always takes seeing other people’s photos on Instagram to remind me of International Mountain Day. It’s kinda hard to remember as there are so many international or nationals “days” dedicated to one thing or another. But I’ll happily celebrate this one as I’ve come to love the mountains for their aesthetics and wildness, and their ability to bring me perspective and peace.

This view of the Tantalus Range (from the south-east rather than the more common and visually stunning north-east angle) caught me by surprise as we walked back out of the trees onto the large granite bluffs along Al’s Habrich Ridge trail, the tree branch and the water-carved granite framing the peaks nicely against the perfect blue autumn sky. It was nice to have that as I find many photos of mountains tend to lose some of the grandeur without any surrounding context. To the eye, the mountains look stunning; yet once captured through a lens, that larger picture and sense of place is often lost.

I’ve learned this the hard way over many years of hiking and photographing the local mountains. I still take many a context-free mountain photo, but some peaks are too photogenic not to keep trying!

Lunar pilots

The first-quarter moon hangs between Sky Pilot and Copilot at the end of a balmy autumn day.

Well who can resist such a sight? The moon floating in the sky between two of the most photogenic mountain peaks in the area. The biggest challenge was holding the camera steady, since I was down at 1/30 sec thanks to the polarizer (which helped enhance the colours). But the railing on the patio up at the Sea to Sky gondola makes a pretty good makeshift tripod.

Alas we were too late to have a post-hike celebratory beer, so we had to be content with taking the gondola back down and finding beer elsewhere.