Summer views

Another Friday, another flashback. I posted a photo of this view back in October last year after the first fall of snow (feel free to scroll back through my feed to find it). It was nice to revisit it on a warmer day.

As we headed out on our hike, I kept an eye on the view back towards the lake to see if it would be possible to recognize the spot where we sat in the snow last October. It turned out to be easy and I could even identify the very rock we’d sat on. Without being able to see exactly what I’d taken last year, I did my best to size up what seemed to be the most likely composition, hoping that consistency would be on my side.

Reproducing the scene turned out to be surprisingly easy, but where I got it wrong was in my editing of the photo above; I was a little too keen to crop out the right-hand side, and I used a different aspect ratio (4:3 rather than 3:2) which I can put down to using a different camera. The end result makes for quite a nice comparison. See for yourself:

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Winter in July

Flashback-Friday to four weeks ago and a thundery summer hailstorm that turned the surrounding landscape white while we huddled under a tarp.

We suspected that we’d be in for some wild weather as we watched the sunlit snow pellets float towards us on the wind. For the longest time it looked like we might escape as we watched heavy showers drift either side of us. But as we retraced our steps back down to Camel Pass, a clap of thunder had us scurrying down towards the treeline as fast as we could safely scramble. The thunder got closer and we walked faster as hail began to fall.

We made it to a small clump of spruce trees, stashed the metal items in our possession several metres away, and pulled out our never-before-used Siltarp to provide some cover against the now-stinging hailstones. Then a flash and crack of thunder right overhead. We’d definitely made the right call to get off the ridge: thunderstorms in the alpine are no joke.

The tarp was our shelter for the next hour as a mix of hail and snow fell all around us, decorating the landscape in a thin coat of white. Our sunflower butter and apple chip wraps included pea-size hail pellets for a little extra crunch. As it finally tapered off and ended, we picked up our gear and walked the rest of the way back down to our tent, marvelling at how the scenery had changed in such a short time. By the end of the day it had all melted, but for a few hours we had a bracing dose of winter in July.

Exploration

The South Chilcotin Mountains provincial park is absolutely stunning and one of the best backpacking areas I’ve ever visited. I cannot wait to plan more trips there! But it’s not a place for beginners – do not venture into this area without significant planning and experience. Most of the park has no facilities so you must be self-sufficient and practice your best leave no trace skills.

So many photos to choose from, I picked this one of Harris Ridge with the Dickson Range as backdrop to get me started. Wow!

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The South Chilcotin Mountains provincial park is absolutely stunning and one of the best backpacking areas I've ever visited. I cannot wait to plan more trips there! But it's not a place for beginners – do not venture into this area without significant planning and experience. Most of the park has no facilities so you must be self-sufficient and practice your best leave no trace skills. So many photos to choose from, I picked this one of Harris Ridge with the Dickson Range as backdrop to get me started. Wow! #backpacking #hiking #southchilcotinmountainsprovincialpark #southernchilcotins #bcparks #explorebc #beautifulbritishcolumbia #beautifulbc #leavenotrace #lnt #tripplanning #mountainmonday

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“Wow” doesn’t even begin to describe how it felt to explore this small part of the Southern Chilcotins. It felt vast, endless, remote, and yet approachable, unlike many of the more jagged mountain ranges and deep valleys of the Coast Mountains. Our five days here was some of the most enjoyable backcountry time we’ve had in a while, probably since Cape Scott in 2016.

And that was despite the mosquitoes (which were horrendous in one valley, merely annoying elsewhere), getting caught in a hailstorm with thunder and lightning, and getting rained out on our last couple of days which had us cut our trip short by a day. The hiking was excellent, the trails were easy going (for the most part), and the flowers were endless. So many flowers!! The meadows were just filled with every type of flower imaginable, including a few new ones for us that we’ve yet to identify. I can’t wait to go back!

I was surprised by the complete lack of facilities at any of the suggested camping areas: I think I expected we would encounter campgrounds, or at least established camping spots. In reality we had to make it up ourselves, and use our backcountry knowledge and experience to decide on good places to camp. We ensured we ate about 100 m from our tent, and hung our food (our Ursacks were invaluable) a similar distance away.

One of the highlights was seeing a grizzly bear wandering through a meadow as we ate breakfast. At only 200 m away, it felt awfully close, especially as our bear spray was 100 m closer to the bear than we were! But we soon learned that the bears want nothing to do with people as the sound of a mountain biker’s voice startled the bear into running for tree cover.

The hike up to Harris Ridge (seen in the photo) was definitely the best day of exploration, following the high ridge to its end with views that covered all the valleys we’d hiked through to get to where we were at that moment. Plus we could see nothing but mountain range upon mountain range in every direction. So much to explore, so little time…

Still winter

The view up to Mount Matier and its namesake glacier from lower Joffre Lake – still very much frozen, very much snowy. It’s late in the day for Trip-Plan Tuesday but after reading a few posts and seeing the number of unprepared hikers at Joffre Lakes I feel compelled to add my two cents.

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The view up to Mount Matier and its namesake glacier from lower Joffre Lake – still very much frozen, very much snowy. It's late in the day for #TripPlanTuesday but after reading a few posts and seeing the number of unprepared hikers at Joffre Lakes I feel compelled to add my two cents. With a warm weekend in the city it's perhaps not surprising that people want to get out and enjoy the outdoors. But don't you think that driving past 5-foot snowbanks at the side of the road would be a bit of a clue as to how snowy the hiking trails might be? Don't you think that heading into the mountains wearing your casual street clothes might not be the best idea? Did you bring a hat? Gloves? Has your phone battery just died due to the cold? My concern is that those who made it up to upper Joffre Lake and back without incident will have learned nothing from their trip. They slipped and slid their way up, and avoided sliding off the trail into the trees or creek below on the way down. They made it back to the car with freezing cold hands, a little hungry and thirsty. It was all good fun (as it should be!) and maybe they managed to squeeze a photo or two out of their phone before the battery gave up. Maybe that photo made it onto Instagram and shows what a great time they had. But I would like to think that something registered in their mind that maybe next time they should wear more suitable footwear, maybe buy some microspikes, and make sure their phone is fully charged when they leave the car. Maybe find out more about the trail conditions beforehand, and bring some warmer clothes. So as a relatively experienced hiker I feel I have to spread the word and encourage anyone and everyone heading out into the backcountry to do some trip research and planning before you go, especially now as we head into shoulder season. Check the AdventureSmart website, and check local hiking websites, forums, and Facebook groups. We hikers are an amiable bunch and we love telling others about our hikes! #joffrelakes #joffrelakesprovincialpark #hiking #snowshoeing #bcparks #mybcparks #standupforparks #explorebc #beautifulbc #tenessentials #beautifulbritishcolumbia #adventuresmart #ifttt

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With a warm weekend in the city it’s perhaps not surprising that people want to get out and enjoy the outdoors. But don’t you think that driving past 5-foot snowbanks at the side of the road would be a bit of a clue as to how snowy the hiking trails might be? Don’t you think that heading into the mountains wearing your casual street clothes might not be the best idea? Did you bring a hat? Gloves? Has your phone battery just died due to the cold?

My concern is that those who made it up to upper Joffre Lake and back without incident will have learned nothing from their trip. They slipped and slid their way up, and avoided sliding off the trail into the trees or creek below on the way down. They made it back to the car with freezing cold hands, a little hungry and thirsty. It was all good fun (as it should be!) and maybe they managed to squeeze a photo or two out of their phone before the battery gave up. Maybe that photo made it onto Instagram and shows what a great time they had.

But I would like to think that something registered in their mind that maybe next time they should wear more suitable footwear, maybe buy some microspikes, and make sure their phone is fully charged when they leave the car. Maybe find out more about the trail conditions beforehand, and bring some warmer clothes.

So as a relatively experienced hiker I feel I should spread the word and encourage anyone and everyone heading out into the backcountry to do some trip research and planning before you go, especially now as we head into shoulder season. Check the AdventureSmart website, and check local hiking websites, forums, and Facebook groups. We hikers are an amiable bunch and we love telling others about our hikes!

Postscript: I’ve been wanting to make some of these points for a while now but had not taken the time to write them out in a coherent manner. I still need to let my ideas gel a bit more before writing a more thoughtful and better-reasoned article, but the essence of what I want to get across is the fact that getting away with being unprepared likely means that nothing is learned from the situation. As a result, the same mistakes are repeated until something goes wrong.

And I believe that’s my first Instagram “blog” post 🙂

To hear the mountains Rohr

What else do you do after a 5-day backpacking trip? Why you go on another backpacking trip of course!

It rained all day as we walked out of the Lizzie-Stein divide, and the weather forecast wasn’t looking good for the rest of the week. Our friends had only booked off enough time to do the Lizzie-Stein trip, while we had another 5 days to fill. Feeling a bit fed-up with the weather, we washed and dried all our gear at the Pemberton Valley Lodge (which was an awesome place to stay, by the way), and had a leisurely morning grabbing some breakfast before stopping off at North Arm farm for some extra goodies.

We’d formed a plan to do a little car-camping road trip that would take us into the warmer and drier interior of BC, and had packed the car accordingly. But as we headed across the Duffey Lake Road, we noticed the clouds were clearing over the mountains. That prompted an abrupt change of plan and we pulled off the road, unpacked the car, spread out our tarp, and re-packed our backpacks for a 3-day adventure. We then headed up the road towards the Marriot-Rohr area and had a leisurely late-afternoon hike up to Rohr Lake which was home for the next two nights.

1. Clouds over Mt Currie, as seen from North Arm Farm after savouring some gelato on the swings 🙂

We’ve driven past North Arm Farm so many times before that we were really pleased we had an excuse to stop off and sample some of their goodies. We opted for some gelato that we consumed out in the back yard, and just enjoyed the view, feeling like we were on vacation.

2. Evening light on Rancherie reflected in Rohr Lake. We camped where I’m standing – that’s someone else’s tent 🙂

After a couple of easy hours hauling our packs up to the lake, we sat back and relaxed to watch the sunset. It was so quiet up there, and the water was perfectly still. The stars came out and we crawled into our tent.

3. The Joffre Group as seen from the summit of Mt Rohr.

The following day we set out to re-attempt Mt Rohr, a summit we’d had to turn back from a few years ago due to snow and time constraints. This day we had no such trouble and were thrilled to make it to the top. The view was just incredible, with the peaks of the Joffre Group rising up and dominating the skyline to our south. Mt Rohr instantly became one of our favourite summits.

4. Shades of green and blue.

I always enjoy looking into the next valley when I reach a pass or mountain summit. Here was no exception and we were greeted by this gorgeous pair of lakes, one green and fed by a pocket glacier, the other a deeper greeny-blue. Beyond lay the usual sea of mountains, and a glimpse of Duffey Lake itself. More reasons to love this area!