Cloudscapes

Cloudscapes – last night’s sunset lit up some great cloud formations and it got me sifting through some recent cloud photos which made me realize 1) how much I enjoy looking at clouds, and 2) just how many photos I take of clouds 🙂

  1. Light pillar in the sky – I started with this photo as it’s the most striking, a column of pale pink topped by a wedge of extra pink. I’ve often seen a vertical line (of course that’s just a projection) after sunset but it was a novelty to see the embellishment at the “top”. My first thought was that it looked a bit like a pink peacock feather.
  2. Coloured lines – parallel(-ish) lines always catch my eye. I like how the lines in the clouds seem to run parallel to the top of Black Mountain.
  3. Sweep – a wider view of the above two shots showing the clouds sweeping across the western sky and the transition from pink to grey as the sun sets.
  4. Before sunset – it’s not just sunset that produces great clouds; about an hour before we were treated to this lovely display of more sweeping clouds and interesting patterns, bright white against the deep blue sky. I’d have been happy enough if this was the best cloud display of the day!
  5. Where grey meets greyer – on Sunday blue sky gave way to white then grey clouds, then very grey clouds as a strong frontal system moved in from the west. I love the contrast between the two, and the texture in the paler clouds above.
  6. Night shiners – our first noctilucent cloud sightings in over a decade! It was a treat to see them again, their silvery waves in an indigo sky. I suppose it makes sense: noctilucent clouds tend to show up around solar minimum, which has an 11-year cycle and it was indeed 11 years ago that we first (and last) saw them.
  7. Afloat – taken from Eagle Bluffs a few months ago, I really like the different layers of clouds and the way they appear from this higher vantage point which seems to create more depth than usual in cloud photos.

For more cloud photos, check out our set on Flickr.

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Peaceful

A beautifully peaceful hike to Petgill Lake today, with views of the Chief, Garibaldi, and Black Tusk with a nice selection of flowers to keep us company including Columbia lily, Queen’s Cup, coralroot, and pinesap. Petgill Lake itself isn’t much to look at but it is surrounded by gorgeous old-growth forest with a rich understory of berry bushes and young trees.

  1. A cloudy view of the Chief, Howe Sound, Mt Garibaldi, and more. Black Tusk is faintly visible near the upper left. I should have taken this photo on the way up when it was still sunny, but I like the feel of this one as it suits the calm mood of the day.
  2. A massively-multi-headed Columbia lily! We couldn’t believe our eyes when we saw this; many of the lilies had multiple flowers but this one was the most impressive. I suppose the one good thing about the new logging road is the disturbed ground for new growth to find a foothold. In this case, the Columbia lilies are doing quite well.
  3. A few Queen’s cup were in bloom at the edge of a clearcut. It was hard to get a good clear view of them on account of all the debris but I was fortunate to find this little group.
  4. Pink and blue: a pair of nearly-ripe blueberries. We saw a few berries on the bushes near these two and I’m looking forward to them ripening! I like the colour contrast between the two berries and the arrangement: they’re lake a pair of eyes 🙂
  5. Petgill Lake. Meh. Many reports describe it as a pretty little lake, but I beg to differ. It’s alright, but it doesn’t look appealing for a swim, and there are only a couple of spots to get down by the lakeside. Do this hike for the hike, not the lake.
  6. Coralroot – how could I resist? This hike had sooooo much coralroot, but thankfully most of it was past its peak and not worth photographing which saved me a lot of time. (Also most of it was in the shade.) However, I did find some in the sunshine that made for a nice picture.
  7. Yellow coralroot, much rarer but I seem to have seen it on a few hikes already this year. I’ve brightened this photo quite a bit as it was deep in the forest and I deliberately underexposed the shot a little to keep the exposure fast. It’s not pin-sharp but it’s come out quite well for an Instagram-worthy photo.
  8. Pinesap: we saw lots of this today too, and found one area where it was blooming in abundance with more plants flowering than we’ve ever seen on any hike before. Spectacular! Again, most of it was in the shade but one little plant was in bright sunshine long enough for me to get down on my hands and knees to take its picture.

Elk Flowers

I can tell which are my favourite wildflowers by the number of photos I take! And they all seem to be lilies: chocolate lilies, Queen’s Cup (aka bead lilies), and glacier lilies with a guest appearance from a budding Columbia lily. Great to see these early flowers; the rest should be following on strong in a couple of weeks.

Not much I need to say here, so I’ll just say what each photo shows:

  1. Chocolate lilies – we saw about as many as I’ve ever seen in one place on today’s hike, though quite a few were past their peak
  2. Chocolate lily flower close-up
  3. Queen’s Cup – a nice trio of leaves on this one
  4. A pair of Queen’s Cup flowers nestled together
  5. Glacier lilies!!!!!!
  6. I could take pictures of these all day; alas I had barely 2 minutes to grab what I could before we had to turn back
  7. Columbia lily in (double) bud – we saw many of these, all still in bud; in a week or two the meadows will be full of them, nodding in the breeze

It’s kinda funny looking at my Instagram feed at the moment. It doesn’t seem that long since I was lamenting the lack of colour in my feed; now it seems like it’s nothing by flowers! 🙂

Father’s Day

Take 2 (right day this time!) Like father, like son – pointing at mountains! Moments earlier we were pointing at the fish in the lake 🙂 Happy Father’s Day Dad! Photo taken by Maria on our awesome Rockies roadtrip back in 2011.

For reasons unknown I originally posted this photo a week early. Perhaps I can blame our lack of a printed calendar hanging in the kitchen; we never got round to buying one so we have a blank patch of wall in the kitchen where I still expect to be able to see the date…

Anyhow, I love this photo. I have a couple of all-time favourite family photos from that trip, and this is one of them. It makes me smile every time I look at it; both of us in shorts, t-shirt, and a hat, a camera bag at our hip. If I remember correctly, we’re actually shielding our eyes from the sun rather than pointing at a random mountain, but it’s funny to think that we’re adopting a mirror-image pose. (Speaking of mountains, the big snowy one in the upper right is most likely Mount Edith Cavell.)

Over the years I’ve come to realize just how much of a melding of my parents I am, and how, for the most part, all of us are. From mannerisms to sayings, food and drink preferences to health conditions, even the sound of sneezes. They are part of me, and I have become part of them. I get a sense of my own personal history and appreciate all the more what it took to get me started in this life, and I’m so glad that I’ve been able to pay them back a little here and there.

Forest flowers

Think forest hikes have nothing to see? I beg to differ, at least at this time of year! Here’s a selection of flowers seen along the trail to Norvan Falls from a couple of weeks ago: columbine, clasping twistedstalk, bunchberry, wild ginger, false lily-of-the-valley, and the bloom of the tulip poplar (which isn’t native to BC but it’s still one of my favourite trees).

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Think forest hikes have nothing to see? I beg to differ, at least at this time of year! Here's a selection of flowers seen along the trail to Norvan Falls from a couple of weeks ago: columbine, clasping twistedstalk, bunchberry, wild ginger, false lily-of-the-valley, and the bloom of the tulip poplar (which isn't native to BC but it's still one of my favourite trees). #wildflowerwednesday #wildflowers #columbine #westerncolumbine #claspingtwistedstalk #bunchberry #dwarfdogwood #wildginger #falselilyofthevalley #tulippoplar #lynnheadwatersregionalpark #lynnheadwaters #norvanfalls #northshoremountains #northvancouver #hiking #bchiking #hikebc #beautifulbc #beautifulbritishcolumbia #explorebc

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Last Wednesday’s post was about Norvan Falls itself. This week, it’s about the many flowers we saw along the way – a surprising number to be honest.

  1. Plenty of western (red) columbine, also known as the rainflower – seeing so many of these was the first surprise of the hike.
  2. Clasping twistedstalk – the second surprise was finding so many of these flowers, well-hidden below their leaves. I hadn’t really looked closely at them before so it was lovely to discover the delicate little bells and to see the kinked stalk that gives the flower its name.
  3. Bunchberry – so we’ve seen plenty of this by now, but I can’t resist continuing my search for the perfect bunchberry flower to photograph!
  4. Wild ginger – this was the third surprise, finding wild ginger which I’d never seen along this trail before.
  5. False lily of the valley – lots of these in bloom, the hard part was knowing which patch to photograph. I decided on this one with a kilometre marker post as a background. We saw another photographer sizing up a big patch on our way back – I was almost tempted to wait and get the same patch as they were nicely lit, but maybe I’ll save that for another day.
  6. Tulip poplar – OK so this wasn’t seen on the hike but near the community centre a few blocks from our apartment. We fell in love with tulip poplars when we lived in Maryland. Our first autumn there we drove out to Shenandoah National Park to see the colourful foliage and were struck by the tunnels of bright yellow created by these trees. And then the following spring we saw the first of their tulip-like flowers and we were hooked. It’s a nice reminder of our time on the east coast.

Unexpectedly sunny

Yesterday’s wander around Lighthouse Park was unexpectedly sunny and cheery. It’s always nice to be reminded of just how big the trees are, and to enjoy the views from the rocks. No marine life sightings but plenty of bird life including the eagle in the third photo. Find of the day was some harvest brodiaea blooming in the dry grass at Point Atkinson. A couple of hours well spent!

  1. It took me many visits to discover this angle on the lighthouse, but now it’s one of my favourite things to do in the park. And it’s not just the lighthouse; the rocks in the foreground have great colour and shape, even looking like miniature fjords, as if we’re viewing a 3-d relief model. I suppose I have Instagram to thank for encouraging me to seek out this view as I kept seeing others’ photos in my scrolling adventures. Now I just have to spend an evening at this spot to catch the warm light of golden hour.
  2. That tree! For years I assumed this beautifully-shaped tree was a pine – after all, the Latin name for the lodgepole (aka shore) pine is Pinus contorta – but a few visits ago I looked a little closer (which is tricky on account of it being on the edge of a cliff) and found that it was a stubborn little western hemlock. I’ve taken many photos of it over our numerous visits to the park but rarely have I been happy with the result. I’m happy to say that has changed with today’s photo, and I really like this one.
  3. Eagle in a tree, perched at the very top. It was a real treat to get a clear view of it, and a good test of the replacement 55-200 mm lens for our SLRs. What a relief to get well-focused photos again! In a way having a non-functioning telephoto lens for a few months was a useful experiment as it taught me that I do in fact enjoy having access to that extra reach. Even with this lens, though, I still had to crop the photo significantly to create this image.
  4. I was recently reminded of the fact that we’d seen this flower on one of our first ever visits to Lighthouse Park back in June 2005. On that day, the camera totally failed to focus on the flowers; I must have held the camera a little too close. Having seen some photos of this flower on Instagram I was inspired to go look for it again. And yet, as we wandered the trails on the western side of the park, I’d actually forgotten what drew me to the park in the first place, and it was only when Maria pointed out these lovely purple flowers that I even remembered! I guess I was feeling relaxed… Anyway, of course I set about taking as many photos as possible, but in the end couldn’t beat the simplest view of the first flower we found.

Norvan Falls

Norvan Falls on waterfall Wednesday. Not the most spectacular waterfall or hike, but every hike has its season and for Norvan Falls, that’s pretty much now with so much fresh spring growth and a good dose of forest flowers for company. The giant logjam is new since I was last there in 2015. I couldn’t resist including the yellow stream violet seeing as it’s also wildflower Wednesday – it was the only one still blooming!

Getting good photos of Norvan Falls is tricky. There’s often not much water flowing and on a weekend it gets busy so getting a hiker-free view is rare. However, on today’s visit (well, last Saturday’s in reality) I did manage to position myself to get clear views of the falls, either with no one in front of me or mostly hidden by other features.

  1. The falls drop about 10 m into a small pool – since they’re long and thin it’s hard to get them into a square crop, but somehow I managed!
  2. Further downstream the steep sides of the gorge can be seen – it looks quite idyllic from here, and this is the best angle on the area with a few nice boulders in the foreground.
  3. Behind me in the previous photo is this enormous logjam. I’m pretty sure this did not come over the falls, but there’s a drainage/debris chute off to the left that I’ve never explored that I suspect is a more likely source of it. The fallen Douglas fir trunks make for a colourful foreground.
  4. A tiny splash of colour, a yellow stream violet, one of only a few that were still blooming. All of the others along the trail had dropped their petals already. I’m pleasantly surprised how the phone camera focused perfectly on the flower.